110 Cookson Lane | Whitefield, ME  04353 | 207-232-7600 |  tim@lackeysailing.com

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Aventura | Monday, September 28, 2015

After a break, it was time to get into the project for real.  The scope of the project was mostly well-defined, and certainly included full restoration (and, as needed, repair) of the hull and deck, so as usual I began by removing deck hardware.  After documenting all the existing installations around the boat, I started at the stem and worked my way aft during the course of the day, removing all the hardware and retaining it mostly for re-use.  The bow and stern pulpits and stanchion bases would not be reinstalled. 

         

    

         

         

         


I removed an old knotmeter instrument (later I'd be removing its through hull impeller also), as well as the compass (no fluid) and a depthsounder instrument, which might be reinstalled.  I also removed a wooden filler/backing plate around the depthsounder, since I preferred to patch the large square hole along with the knotmeter hole beneath, then reinstall the instrument properly as need be.

    

I hadn't planned--nor wanted--to remove the overhead panels that someone had installed in the main cabin, as the initial scope of the project didn't include major cosmetic work on the interior.  Unfortunately, these panels had been installed over the nuts securing some of the cabin top hardware, so I had to remove the panels for access.  The panels were installed with some strips of polyester-soaked mat tape, most of which peeled off without much effort, though some of the tabbing had actually stuck and would require more work to remove.  The panels themselves were poor quality plywood covered with vinyl material, and while they'd looked OK before I had to touch them, it seemed clear that they were not worth salvaging.

         

         

When I removed the port genoa winch, I was amused to find the base full of small rocks.  Apparently a child (or a very bored adult) had had a fun afternoon dropping these through the winch handle opening in the winch.  There was only one rock inside the starboard winch.

The owner requested I remove the fresh water tank and related plumbing, so with all the deck hardware now off the boat I continued inside.  The tank was secured minimally with some tabbed-in blocking that I removed bare-handed, then removed the tank and its fill and vent hoses and deck fitting without issue.

         


Renewing the cockpit scupper drains and through hulls was on the list for the project, and a good thing too.  The port hose was virtually nonexistent with deterioration, and while the starboard hose was in better shape, I found that the plastic drain fitting broke at the cockpit when I tried to remove the hose, leaving nothing worth saving on either side.  I'd continue work on these fittings' removal presently.

         
 

Total Time Billed on This Job Today:  6.5 Hours

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0600 Weather Report:
50, clear.  Forecast for the day:  Partly sunny, low 70s,